Pebble Mine

Jason Sear

Opponents of mining in the Bristol Bay watershed celebrate Administrator Scott Pruitt’s announcement and are committed to remaining vocal on the issue. On the other hand, four village corporations with land near or adjacent to the Pebble deposit have called on Pruitt to “ensure a full and fair review for the project” and are concerned that proposed restrictions could impede that process.

Photo courtesy of U.S. EPA

EPA administrator Scott Pruit announced Friday that the EPA is suspending efforts to reverse an Obama-era proposal to restrict mining in Bristol Bay.

Pebble puts a plan on the table

Jan 9, 2018
Pebble permit filing, courtesty USACE

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers accepted a permit application for Pebble's proposed plan to mine the copper and gold deposit northwest of Iliamna.

Pebble names First Quantum Minerals as new partner

Dec 18, 2017
Jason Sear - KDLG

First Quantum Minerals will buy in at $150 million over the next four years, during the permitting phase, and will have the option to become a 50 percent partner with Northern Dynasty for an additional $1.35 billion if the mine goes into production.


Pebble believes BBNC and its shareholders could benefit immensely with in-region contracts and revenue sharing if the mine moves forward. BBNC says it's not interested in working on a project it has openly opposed since 2009.


Despite firm opposition to the Pebble Mine, BBNC believes HB 199 and the Stand for Salmon ballot initiative threaten responsible resource development and possibly even subsistence activities.

Pedro Bay village council signs on with UTBB, and Pebble taps former Univ. of Alaska president Ret. Maj. Gen. Mark Hamilton to head up external affairs. Pebble still says it plans to enter the permitting process this year.

Elizabeth Harball

Agency staff heard support and opposition for withdrawing the proposed preemptive mining restrictions in the Bristol Bay watershed. Some residents spoke up about the benefits of working for Pebble and why they and their village corporations deserve to see Pebble Mine apply for permits.


In close to four hours of public testimony, dozens told EPA staffers that large-scale mining threatens a fishery and way of life in Bristol Bay. The unanimous opinion given during Wednesday's meeting, held during the middle of the work day, was EPA should finalize preemptive Section 404(c) Clean Water Act restrictions, not withdraw them and wait for an Environmental Impact Statement.

Former state senate president Rick Halford critical of Pebble's new effort to reintroduce the project in a smaller package, saying the move is aimed at "mining the stock market," not the copper and gold.

First glance at Pebble's new plans

Oct 5, 2017

Company reduced the scope of the project to 5.4 square miles, which would impact "negligible" amounts of fish habitat in the North and South Fork Koktuli drainages, says CEO Tom Collier. He intends to file for a permit application before the end of the year, but has not yet named a financial-backing partner.

AlexAnna Salmon’s bold advocacy for a way of life

Oct 4, 2017

Igiugig leader joins Pebble Advisory Committee to try and affect what happens as the company prepares a “life-transforming” project in her backyard. Her stewardship is not without its critics, who argue working with Pebble helps the company's sales pitch. Salmon argues that there are some realities not likely to change, and others she may be able to influence for future generations.

Bristol Bay braces for long awaited Pebble Mine plans

Oct 3, 2017

On Thursday, Pebble CEO Tom Collier is expected to roll out details of the company's smaller plan to mine the copper and gold deposit northwest of Iliamna. Bristol Bay's residents and leaders, including some of Pebble's loudest opponents, are gearing up to finally get a look behind the curtain of this proposed project.

Brandon Hill

The recently formed Pebble advisory committee advisory committee met to discuss issues related to the Pebble project and to tour the site of the proposed mine. Groups opposed to the mine hit the Anchorage streets with signs and umbrellas to protest.

After weeks of hostility, Williams says a respectful letter from BBNC board chair Joe Chythlook convinced her to step down. Williams had hired an attorney to protect her seat on BBNC board after she agreed to join new Pebble committee as an opponent to the mine.