Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday 7am - 8am
Rachel Martin

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein.

Weekend Edition Sunday debuted on January 18, 1987, with host Susan Stamberg. Two years later, Liane Hansen took over the host chair, a position she held for 22 years. In that time, Hansen interviewed movers and shakers in politics, science, business and the arts. Her reporting travels took her from the slums of Cairo to the iron mines of Michigan's Upper Peninsula; from the oyster beds on the bayou in Houma, La., to Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park; and from the kitchens of Colonial Williamsburg, Va., to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated.

In January 2012, Rachel Martin began hosting the program. Previously she served as NPR National Security Correspondent and was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project. She has also been the NPR religion correspondent and foreign correspondent based in Berlin.

Weekend Edition - Sunday

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NPR Ed
3:35 am
Sun May 31, 2015

Adult Course Offers Learning For The Sake Of Learning

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sun May 31, 2015 8:12 am

When we talk about higher education for the poor, we often mean community colleges and getting a degree in order to make more money. But 20 years ago, a writer in New York City decided that the poorest members of society should have the same access as wealthier people to learning, just for the sake of learning.

I visited one of these programs — called a Clemente course — in Harlem on a Thursday night.

"Can you live in a good life in a society where people are doing different things?" asks the teacher. "Of course," replies a student.

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National Security
5:39 am
Sun May 24, 2015

At Dover Air Force Base, Bringing Home The Fallen With Grief And Joy

A carry team at Dover Air Force Base trains on the proper protocol for a dignified transfer.
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 9:44 am

There is a grim kind of math that comes with war.

Most of the troops who died during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were flown to Dover Air Force base in Delaware. And for most of the wars, those dignified transfers were off limits to the press. That changed in 2009, when President Obama lifted the media ban and paid a visit to Dover himself.

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Latin America
4:38 am
Sun May 24, 2015

Accusations Pile Up Against Panama's Former President

Panama's former President Ricardo Martinelli answers questions during an interview at a hotel in Guatemala City in January.
Moises Castillo AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:40 am

Former Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli wasn't always rich.

One of Central America's richest and most eccentric former politicians, Martinelli started off as a credit officer at Citibank in Panama. He bought one business, then another. Among his holdings is the country's largest supermarket chain, Super 99, known for bargain prices and catchy jingles.

But while his jingles may get Panamanian's hips moving, Martinelli's alleged pilfering and profiteering make their blood boil.

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The Sunday Conversation
4:02 am
Sun May 24, 2015

'How Could You Not Know You Were Pregnant?'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 7:15 am

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Brittany Ohman is a 41-year-old mother of two and a licensed social worker in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ohman and NPR's Rachel Martin grew up together and were good friends through high school. When they were seniors, Ohman got pregnant and no one knew. She didn't even know — and she knows that sounds crazy. She has heard the question for years.

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Sports
3:31 am
Sun May 24, 2015

NFL Aims To Spice Up Games With Tweak To Extra Point Rules

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 7:15 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
3:31 am
Sun May 24, 2015

Colorado's Free IUD Program Set To End In July

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 7:15 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
3:31 am
Sun May 24, 2015

To Build Up Its Historical Image, Macedonia Is Going Baroque

A statue of Olympias, mother of Alexander the Great, depicts her as pregnant with her famous son. It's part of a monument to Alexander's family in Skopje, the Macedonian capital.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Sun May 24, 2015 11:23 am

Martin Panovski used to like hanging out in the center of his hometown, Skopje, the capital of Macedonia, a tiny Balkan nation that was, until 1991, part of Yugoslavia. Skopje's an old city, with complex, multi-ethnic layers of Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman history.

"Even the communist era produced some interesting contemporary architecture," says Panovski, an architect in hip eyeglasses.

The nationalist government of prime minister Nikola Gruevski did not agree. "The capital did not look European," says Nikola Zezov, a historian and Gruevski supporter. "It looked boring."

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The Salt
5:00 am
Sun May 17, 2015

South Carolina Distiller Promises To Make Kentucky Liquor Quicker

Jars of Terressentia bourbon wait for final production. Terressentia uses a process to artificially "age" its bourbon in a few hours, forgoing traditional aging, which takes years.
Courtesy of Terressentia

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:04 am

Kentucky bourbon is in high demand these days. Sales and production of the whiskey have surged in recent years.

The demand has created a problem: a shortage of barrels. Bourbon is typically aged for several years in wooden casks.

But one company has found a work-around. It's come up with a chemical process that ages bourbon not in years — but in hours. The innovation is unsettling an industry that is long-soaked in history and tradition.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:49 am
Sun May 17, 2015

After Thaw, Minnesota Orchestra Returns To Cuba

The Minnesota Orchestra under the direction of conductor Osmo Vanska (center) performs during a concert at the Cuban National Theater in Havana on Friday.
Yamil Lage AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:44 am

The Minnesota Orchestra plays Havana this weekend. It's the first professional U.S. orchestra to perform in Cuba since the United States and the island nation began the process of normalization last December. For the musicians, this trip is about healing — both diplomatically and for themselves.

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Author Interviews
4:32 am
Sun May 17, 2015

'The Gracekeepers' Sets Damplings Against The Landlockers

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
4:32 am
Sun May 17, 2015

Blogging In Bangladesh Is A Deadly Occupation

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 6:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:32 am
Sun May 17, 2015

As Amtrak's Train Cars Age, Ridership Skew Young

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 11:38 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Fifty-two...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: ...452...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: ...25...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: ...6.112...

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All Tech Considered
6:06 am
Sun May 10, 2015

Coming Soon To A Highway Near You: A Semitruck With A Brain

The Daimler Freightliner Inspiration, a self-driving long-haul truck, is seen during an event at the Hoover Dam, May 5, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev.
John Locher AP

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 5:14 am

Imagine you're on the highway. You glance into the cab of the 18-wheeler next to you — and there's no driver. That day might be getting closer.

Automaker Daimler unveiled a truck last week that drives itself, called the Freightliner Inspiration. But the truck is not yet entirely autonomous.

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Around the Nation
5:24 am
Sun May 10, 2015

Being Transgender At Work Can Be Hard, But Made Easier With An Ally

Bjorn Rune Lie Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 12:44 pm

Bruce Jenner's national TV interview with Diane Sawyer in April ended months of speculation. The former Olympian turned reality TV star revealed that he now identifies as a transgender woman — though he still prefers to be called "he" for the time being.

Jenner was hailed as a hero for his openness on an issue that has caused real heartache for many. National surveys show an unusually high rate of attempted suicide among people who are transgender.

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The Howard Project
4:36 am
Sun May 10, 2015

Gratitude, Disbelief, Optimism: Howard Students On Graduation Day

Ariel Alford and Leighton Watson exchange congratulations after Howard University's graduation commencement on Saturday.
Emily Jan for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 11:32 am

This weekend, the Class of 2015 graduated from Howard University, a historically black college located about a mile from NPR's headquarters. The new graduates include two of the students who have spent the last semester talking with NPR's Weekend Edition about their college experience.

Leighton Watson and Kevin Peterman are still kind of in denial.

"It's very surreal, because I think a lot of people expect you to feel like you've graduated earlier in the process," says Watson. "But it literally didn't hit me until I was walking off of the stage and out."

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