Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And now for an update - two years ago when I was NPR's Brazil correspondent, I danced in Rio de Janeiro's famous Sambadrome with the Vila Isabel Samba School. Here's me at the end of that experience.

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Time now for the Call-In. This week we asked you for your stories about living on a hundred-thousand dollars a year.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Hello.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Hello.

KRIS WATERIS: Hi, my name is Kris Wateris (ph).

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

When I was down in Texas, I met a man who can be found singing over the sound of his blow dryer.

ALBERTO ESCOBEDO: (Singing in Spanish).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Alberto Escobedo owns a salon in Rio Grande City, and he's always loved music, especially opera.

Like most comedians, Cristela Alonzo draws upon her own experiences for her source material. That means, as a first-generation American, Alonzo has also always tackled challenging topics in her comedy. She now lives in California, but she grew up just 9 miles from the Mexico border, in San Juan, Texas.

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LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Coffee lovers, alert! A new report says that the world's coffee supply may be in danger owing to climate change. In the world's biggest coffee-producing nation, Brazil, the effects of warming temperatures are already being felt in some communities.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In the opening ceremony of Rio's Olympic Games, Brazil's favelas, or shantytowns, were showcased as the birthplace of a lot of Brazil's culture.

That was showbiz. In three of the most iconic communities, the reality of how these Olympics are affecting favela residents is more complicated.

Brazil is one of the most unequal countries in the world. In Rio, at least 25 percent of the population lives in impoverished communities.

Take Santa Marta. Perched above Rio's expensive South Zone, it's the city's most internationally famous favela.

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